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before, but people in the background who don't realize they are live on the air. the young journalist who is waiting at the printer who she real eyes the camera is on her. >> students can register tomorrow and registration is open until friday. they will notify the winners by monday december 15th and vouchers can then be picked up thursday through thursday. students with more than 90 hours have the best chance of getting tickets. everyone is welcome to sib up. live from the newsroom, wuft news. >> then the old adage of picking your stories carefully. >> it is important that you keep the bed bugs out of your home the best way. you might want to use a plastic bag like this one. >> just keep on picking. >> those are people in the background. the news anchor himself or herself must be aware of the camera. what? >> what? >> what? that hurts. a gentle reminder to all of us, when the light goes on, you are live on the air and the >>> "outfront" next, when it comes to america's troops, is president obama calling the shots, or is hamid karzai? >>> plus, losing steam and almost out o
to read the intentions of someone i don't know. it certainly was damaging because what it did was, what was a secure classified communication very candid assessment of the situation and recommendations ahead. it leaked that publicly before the president and his team and the president of defense had a time to digest it and therefore the decision-making process instead of being done in a calm way, had that sort of glare of publicity on it. >> rose: it looks like in some cases this was, although it had not, it was a general trying to influence the public debate in washington. >> it was not the case. >> rose: would you agree some people might have assumed that. >> i assumed some can. >> rose: it had poisoned the water between the general and the commander in chief. >> i don't think between myself and president obama. i think that there was less trust between department of defense, parts of it, and the new administration that i would have liked to see. i think it really went back to the very beginning from inauguration on. and i think that that trust is something that -- >> rose: from th
sign it. >> citing things that this really don't want us to see. john: what if u are hiding things you don't want the government to see? >> whatever it is that what. >> the founder of with a pds. >> the internet and communication. that wld be good. john: the teacher does not have to be good. john: freedom to put up. >> will increase. john: that's our show. ♪ john: what keeps you safe? what prevents fraud? most people you asks a government. government must lay out the rules and punish fraud. protect people. so government regulates. over the years as more regulations and america we now have 170,000 pages of rules. people think we can't live without these, but then ame the internet. almost entirely unregulated, and it works. it is given us a new level of freedom. let's call it freedom -- "freedom 2.0". i could not have imagined it before coble, would compete. i assume the services like those could not work. what a joke. who would buy an unseen product from a total stranger without government regulation, it would make sure that the sellers are honest and a product for the. another joke.
applaud women going forward. i don't look like a person of color but if you look at my freckles i consider myself a person of color too. i have worked in district 3, closely with many supervisors. welcome to supervisor yee and breed, welcome aboard. this is a great group. in this me very proud to be a san franciscan, and to call him my supervisor. thank you very much. >> president: next speaker. >> good afternoon and happy new year to you all. it is a pleasure to be here. my name is mattie scott, the founder of healing for our families and our nation, working hard in san francisco over the last 16 years to stop senseless violence. i lost my youngest son to gun violence in 1996, july 17th. we have been ever since trying to educate the leaders, our children, law enforcement, the board of supervisors and everyone present so that we do have one of the situation. i am happy that my district supervisor, london breed, who grew up where my son was killed 16 years ago, is my supervisor for district 5. welcome london. i appreciate the work that you have done supervisor cohen -- and
a study on us. the joke is a study to me he met i don't know, maybe the guy with the gold shirt will help them. [laughter] [talking over each other] >> all right,. melissa: that is all the "money" we have for you today. "the willis report" is coming up next. gerri: tonight, welfare recipients taking out cash outstripped countless we have details of a disturbing new story. welcome to "the willis report" we begin tonight with fears of tighter gun restrictions across the u.s. now there is growing concern say new legislation may soon put them out of business. joining me now is north american firearms. a gun store outside of chicago. welcome to you all. it's great to have you here. i am going to start with bernadette. take a look at the numbers here. it is unbelievable. we have had twice as many gun sales in november to december, as many background checks on the same time a year ago. it is astonishing how many guns are being sold across this country. what are your customers telling you about why they are buying? >> they are saying if they don't buy the guns now, they fear for the band. not onl
they are buying? >> they are saying if they don't buy the guns now, they fear for the band. not only here in the state of illinois, but of course in the united states. and theears are now more than they ever have been. gerri: essentially we are talking about the president having a working group. we don't really know what they are yet, although we have said universal background checks for all gun buyers, mental health examinations and tougher penalties for those carrying firearms near schools. that is what the white house is talking about. a lot of people don't like this. tell me, what are you afraid of? what do you think this is bringing on for you? >> well, you kno the main thing is it is all speclation. what it is doing is clearing out and on the surface that may seem good for business. but the problem is our distributors and the people that we actually purchase our weapons from for our customers -- they are holding back amongst everything. you know, the whole gun industry just in general is out of whack. everything is out of whack. gerri: you told our producers that you are afraid that
not the developers. furthermore we don't need high-rise condo, 136 feet. we don't need a park. i presided ferry park, along the waterfront. we don't need another little park on the waterfront. don't be convinced by this developer that he's doing the right thing, by breaking through jackson street and all that hogwash. vote the will of the people. that's what you are here to represent. thank you very much. >> next speaker. >> thank you president chiu. members of the board of supervisors. i want to welcome everybody here. first day of school. happy new year and welcome to all. i'm here to represent the league of pissed off voters. we put out a voter guide and kicked some rear. the last time i spoke was really not for the league; it was just as a normal, everyday citizen the district 5, a longtime resident of district 5. i want to welcome our newest leader. what i want to say here today is that we would like to support a woman of color for the board president position. and specifically, we would like to support supervisor jane kim. if you could reach down, think about the conversations that
with the lovely kathie lee and hoda have their morning meeting. >> please don't disturb us. [ laughter ] >> can i say something? that really is us before hair and makeup. >> that -- >> laura and mary are geniuses. >> that was -- >> that's funny. >> that's hysterical. >> we'll have to find a way to get back at jay for that. >> oscar nominations came out today. that is a huge, huge deal. >> i guess the little taste of what it's going to be like with seth macfarlane who some people know well. and other people -- you walked in and said who is that? somebody did. >> i didn't. please don't put me in that category. i know who he was. he is very, very funny. >> anyway, the big headline today was "lincoln" led the pack. "lincoln" got 12 nominations. >> all of them well deserved according to you. >> it's such a terrific movie. >> best picture ""amour."" >> this was a huge category. >> nominated for film of the year. "argo" "beasts of the southern wild," "django unchained, cody saw it last night and said it was really rough stuff, but he liked it. "les miserables," "life of pi." "zero dark 30." the kids saw
and played -- i don't know. it was bad. >> i really went to bed. >> if i didn't stay up the previous night -- >> i know. >> you didn't stay up for it? >> i did not. and if i didn't stay up to that, i'm not staying up for some football game, i'll tell you that. >> my soap opera boys who are here. >> i was thinking about you watching the -- because we hadn't seen the actual end of season two. and i was thinking about what you're missing. there's no way you should not be watching it. >> eventually i will watch it. >> there are. >> i can watch the one that's on. i need to watch it when i -- it's like the new way people view. when you can, when you get a chance. >> did you see that michelle caruso cabrera has the third season on dvd? >> she gave me my soap. >> she did? >> she did. >> she came over the other day. you weren't there at the time, but she was going to show them off. >> yeah. >> let's start with the markets this morning, as well. the s&p retreating from a five-year high yesterday. the stocks finished the session off their lows. u.s. equities are indicated a little weaker. dow futures
checks and guns carrying near schools or giving them to minors. we don't know what strengthened and stiffened penalties. t there are a lot of loose terms. >> tucker: we don't know anything, other than the mental component would have had an impact. it's hard to see to not see this as a power grab, none of these are related to what americans are upset about. if i give my 16-year-old a shotgun, they have to register, the burden falls on people who haven't committed a crime. >> clayton: you don't have to register the shotgun now. >> alisyn: you don't have to let authorities know. >> tucker: the federal authorities. in new york state perhaps you would, but most states you don't. >> alisyn: as we know the atf has a problem with that, tasked with regulating firearms, has a problem not significanting out which gun is going where, when people give them away, sell them. if it's stolen. atf one of the agencies that called for the national data base. obviously that's controversial. people don't want to be in a data base, they want to have-- >> this came up in the wake of the shootings in au
to par. you also don't just want to just make some kind of announcement without thinking it through. i talked to a senior administration official who said to lead 10,000 troops in afghanistan could cost us $30 billion a year. the president also has to make an economic decision, as well. so, look, if panetta is saying i want it done in weeks and the president is simply saying i'm going to take a few more months, i say take your time because you're dealing with the lives of american troops. >> that's a fair point. of course, the time -- the clock is ticking, the united states says it's going to withdraw in 2014. it's knot just the delay on troop numbers that had us asking questions today. today the president gave a reason for the delay. said, look, i haven't given recommendations yet for general john allen. here's what the president said. >> i'm going to be over the coming weeks getting recommendations from general allen and other commanders on the ground. >> all right a month ago when i spoke with secretary panetta, he agreed general allen was the one responsible but said the options we
people believe would be more effective. don't forget, there's a lot of history here and joe biden was the person managing the 1994 crime bill, which included the ban on assault weapons. he remembers what happened to democrats after they got past and lost control of the house. >> where could there be some consensus on this issue? >> again, in talking to administration officials about this, who have been involved in some of these sessions, one source said to me that it would be on the background issue. there seems to be a consensus developing that you can close that gun show loophole, require background checks. and the other area is on these high-capacity magazines. if you could limit those high-capacity magazines, then perhaps that would be another way of going at the assault weapons ban without allowing folks to say, you know what, you're taking away my guns because you wouldn't be taking away their guns. you would be just limiting those high-capacity rounds. >> you don't only need to develop a consensus with the republicans, but amongst the democrats you need a consensus because
them about this, they say they don't want gun owners to be discriminated against. again there's no history of insurance companies raising premiums and if you look at the language in the affordable care act you can't charge a higher premium to someone because they own a gun. it's a moot point. some say they just want to get rid of that conversation between health care officials, health care professionals and gun owners. i go to the doctor, they ask me if i have a swimming pool in my background, smoke detectors, carbon monday ca carbon monoxide detectors, guns. >> if you haven't ask any questions of gun owners, you can't compile any statistics or studies that would prove one way or the other. >> that may be it and we talked to the gun control safety people at the cdc and they say we cannot give satisfactory answers because there hasn't been the funding for the research and data and according to the affordable care act the way it stands now that's going to continue not getting that data. >> interesting, sanjay gupta thanks so much. >> you got it, car roll. >>> nearly four months
to me, a lot to you. >> but when you look at the federal debt, maybe not a lot? >> i don't know. i don't know. and you know what? i don't know -- i don't know how big -- >> but at the beginning of the year, you always see a big -- >> and because everything is always contrainan in the stock market and because people rush in at top, i don't necessarily want it to be really big because if it's really big, people are getting ready to -- so i don't know whether it is big. >> you would also think that people would look at this as the prospects for lows on the interest rates. they would say the bond market isn't where i want to be so i'm going to go out on the risk spectrum a little bit. >> i'm still looking in terms of the earlier numbers. >>> let's get to the top corporate story of the morning. it is boeing. phil lebeau is+++j™n dreamliner. the review is likely to include a study of the design and electrical portions of the plane. we will bring you all that news at 9:00. it's 9:30. there it is. phil will join us from d.c. with more in the next half hour. we'll take a look at boeing shares
am the only african american media head. i don't know who to go to to record my history? my name is ace. i am on this case. don't get mad at me. ladies and gentlemen, my name is ace. congratulations queen bee, you made history. i don't know how you did it but god be with you. >> and the reverend jorge garcia. i represent the voice of thousands of latinos in the united states, we are 30 million mexicans, 6 million in california, 1 million in san francisco. david campos for example. john avalos. another personalidades like milt -- the sheriff. they show us how to work together. they come to us in peace. [indiscernible] how do you make new rules. [indiscernible] thank you very much for the example for thousands of young people in this country. gracias por permitir que alli donde terminan sus derechos comienzan los nuestros. god bless this board. >> president: public comment is closed. madam clerk could you please read the next item. >> members will proceed with election of the office of president of the board of supervisors. >> president: on january 8, the board of supervisor
, right now, dealers have to make that transfer, but private citizens don't. that doesn't make much sense to us, because essentially you are putting yourself in the same position as a dealer. you are open to the public. but when we talk about universal checks, people may not understand what that means. that means when you give a gun to your child, or to your spouse, or you sell a gun to a friend or a neighbor, there is an important distinction there. you know who you sold the gun to. and i've never heard anyone say there is some big problem with criminals getting guns from people that own them lawfully and sold it to them. the problem, soledad, there are 500,000 guns stolen of yore in th -- every year in this country. >> so why not have -- a universal check. people would report that their gun was stolen. people would have to say i gave it to my spouse, i gave it to my child, i gave it to my friend, so you could track if that person gave it to somebody else. why would that be a bad thing? and how would it interfere with the second amendment? >> it creates problems where there is no problem
levels from top to bottom. when we talk about organizing a around a singular principal, i don't think the solution is necessarily to consolidate around existing labor movements. it is not necessarily to formulate a third party platform. the solution is to use these tools and use these bodies in order to consolidate power and to use that power to challenge the way in which decisions are made fundamentally. >> i would like to have time for questions from the audience. please go to one of the of mikes so it can be sure to hear you. i will alternate between mikes as long as we have people at them. >> do you think cooperation does not work in this country because people do not know what it means? non-cooperation, civil disobedience. >> and if not, why not? >> in this country. i believe it should work, that is the only way to help in this country, but it does not really work. >> it works, if you get the numbers. the important thing is about building numbers. and sustaining it. but it certainly works. worked in the labor movement. the problem is it destroyed all of the radical movements. i w
if there are delays, if there are problems, we don't really have a fallback option so we are down to a few critical paths for supporting the station, and so, the complementary nature between the commercial programs and the conservation program i felt was one of its strengths. the lack of a clear rationale for human exploration beyond the international space station is another serious problem. the administration's approach of being capability driven while it has a certain logic to it also has a lot of vulnerability. and historically i think a more strictly geopolitical approach such as i've talked about the close cold war approach for leading the international cooperation what in fact be a better approach for the united states. there are others that one could take that simply talking about the capabilities absent a strategic rationale that's integrated with other international u.s. interests i think is a very flout path as we are seeing today. >> thank you my time is expired. >> the gentleman from minnesota michigan, mr. clark. >> thank you mr. chair to get funding for nasa is important but especial
, don't go to your emergency room, call your doctor first. you catch this in the first couple of days, you can get an antiviral. carl, i think today you're going to start to see hospitals delay operations, tell people to get out of the hospital. this has not yet reached epidemic proportions, but that's going to be tossed around the next couple of days. >> we're going to get shots on this desk. dr. nancy snyderman, thanks. >>> meantime, emergency rooms in milwaukee, wisconsin, have seen a surge of flulike symptoms. kevin, good morning. >> yes, at the st. francis hospital, not only here in milwaukee, it's throughout the midwest. as we heard from dr. nancy, it's across the country. this particular milwaukee area, they are actually practicing something they are referring to as diversion where so many hospitals are filled with patients suffering from flu symptoms, they are actually sending ambulances hopscotching from here to there so people get the care. we're fortunate this morning to be joined by dr. cathy shallow. i guess the first question i want to ask is is this worse than, say, the
,some -- somewhere between 3 and 8 million more will lose their homes if we don't do something. it's not in the rearview mirror, in fact, it's out in front of us. there's lots of con we think sos, obviously. first and foremost, it's the families themselves who are disrupted and taken from their homes, and it's worth just thinking about these numbers for a second. i mean, we're talking about three or four or five million more families, that's as many as 20 million more americans. why it's a problem, mike also alluded to, when you're underwater, your behavior changes. you don't spend as much money on anything. the only thing you consume more of, by the way, is health care. because under the stress, you find when you look at those numbers, that's the thing that goes up. so the costs are significant both to the family, but i'd argue to society and, obviously, to the communities in which these people live. foreclosures cost both hard dollars and soft dollars. there are property tax issues, so i say the consequences are felt by all of us. >> mr. miller, do you have anything to add to tha
, at least across the country. they tell us they don't have a count of how many adults may have died. but the cdc estimates flu kills an average of 24,000 people a year. health experts say it's too soon to predict whether this year will be above average, but it certainly started way early. jonathan serrie is live in atlanta, home to the cdc. any word on an end to this? it sounds like it's getting better down south. >> well, you know, that's the strange thing. although flu is widespread in most states, there are early reports suggesting that flu activity may actually be decreasing in some parts of the country. including parts of the south. that could simply be because of lower reporting. people usually put off doctor visits during the holidays except in extreme emergencies. cdc officials say they need a couple more weeks before they can say for sure whether flu activity is actually decreasing in these parts of the country. shep. >> shepard: vaccine supply plentiful, right? >> it is plentiful but so -- there is so much demand for the vaccine now that the cdc is receiving reports of spo
. >> absolutely. >> it's the size of the government. it's intrusion in our lives that's the problem here. we don't talk enough about it, the victims of this policy. it's all savers, particularly seniors, it is our children and grandchildren. what we're doing to them is utterly immoral. we've got to come to grips with that. >> senator, what are you going to do for the debt ceiling? is there a plan that gets us -- it's not going to be a grand plan. >> as a matter of fact, yes. the cbo has got a big thick book, and it shows $4.9 trillion of ways we can reduce spending. it's a menu. >> but you don't think we'll be doing that. are you going to vote for -- >> we'll do dollar for dollar, whether $100 billion to increase the debt ceiling, $200 billion. take your pick, mr. president. >> thank you four a great two hours. "squawk on the street" begins right now. >>> congratulations to the alabama crimson tide, winners of the bcs college football championship for a second straight year. a third time in the last four years. what a run. it good morning, welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm melissa lee, live
this year, but it seems as though it's even conceivable that he could wait out 2013 or no? >> no, i don't think so. i would say he hasn't fallen yet, but we're now into the end game where it's clear he's going to fall and just a question of how long, not just we're predicting, we want him out, but he really is on his way out. i don't think there is any way he will survive 2013, but i'm not convinced there will be a government to replace him by the end of 2013. >> why has he stayed there as long? i was more skeptical that he would fall quickly and the reason was simple. the syrians have a great army, a very strong army, and they have been incredibly brutal in their willingness to use it against the rebels. >> that's part of it. it's a real state. this is not like -- this is a real state but look what happened to the sunnis in iraq. they took their cue from that. they know it's not going to be pretty, the aftermath, plus they had external support. the russians and the chinese diplomatically and the iranians militarily. with military and economic support, oil support. you add all this up a
it is a 787. i don't know if we still have that live shot available but let's put it up while we talk about this. there you go, logan airport. what do they have to do? they have to do something very quickly. you know this company better than anybody around. how do they mobilize? how do they contain this? what should they do next? >> you've got a couple of issues here. if this was a fuel leak for any other plane, it would get a little more attention. the problem is we're in a hyper extension tiff position ramping up production. boeing will try to get out in front of this with a public relations standpoint and say the airlines are continuing to fly this plane, they have overwhelmingly not had problems. there have been major issues reported. they are a bit handcuffed when it comes to the fire investigation. you have to wait and see what the ntsb says initially on the fire investigation. sue, he mentioned it there, investors are walking on egg shells. there's a headline risk. jim cramer on "squawk on the street" said it, i'm worried we'll hear about another problem with the dreamliner. this pla
. don't become a pirate over the weekend. ♪ gerri: hello, everybody. i'm gerri willis. our video games -- are video games to blame for gun violence in this country? vice-president continuing his week-on meetings at the white house seeking ways to reduce gun violence in this country following last month's massacre in newtown, conn. today it was the video-game industry's turn. in those talks were publishers of some of the most violent games out there including electronic arts, activision blizzard his violent game, call of duty, one of the biggest moneymakers ever. this is what it is like to play one of these games which brings him back to the question i started this show with. are video games really to blame? for joining me now, a psychiatrist to things video games are responsible for gun violence. a gaming blogger with sentinel who says they're not to blame. travis, you say your video game player. you say they are not to blame. how so? >> i have been playing video games for around 17 years. at plated number of video games, and at the end of the day when we talk about sandy hook and viol
, as she prepares to step down, saying, don't call it retirement just yet. >> well, i don't know if that's the word i would use, but certainly, stepping off the very fast track for a little while. >> and for now, her fast track includes some growing signs of menace from iran. today, the state department vowed to do something about a father held hostage for years and a family's desperate plea for action. here's abc's chief global affairs correspondent martha raddatz with the story. >> reporter: these are the latest images of robert levinson. the last proof of life, sent anonymously via e-mail to his family, more than a year ago. kept secret in hopes it would help his chances. until now. >> they're very difficult to look at. even today, some of our daughters were crying to me over the phone about how upset they were to see them again. >> reporter: it was nearly six years ago when the father of seven disappeared from the iranian island of kish where he was working as a private investigator. his family has no doubts -- they believe iran is responsible. >> we'd appreci
, it's sort of glasses that they don't put it right in your eye. they put it right above. they can show a video. we have been experimenting what this could be used for. there are obvious uses in your daily lives. we never had a device that records or could record what you saw contemporaneously. think about it. >> so how will we use it? we don't know. not crashing into doors because we're looking at our glasses. >> hopefully there will be telemetry that will tell you you're about to trip. when you have the digital world that tells what the analog world is doing. people fixing eyeglasses and medical applications to more interesting ones involving performers who show the audience what they say in addition to when the audience sees at a performance. there are many, many creative things. you just saw at the new york fashion show where some of the models were wearing this. you looked at what -- one of the eye catching literally trends. another was the whole idea of driverless cars. >> the driver has been doing something else. >> so you know, it's a lexus 450 and there is a button. and you tak
gave to the a.f.l.c.i.o. in 1961. we don't need two movements. if you would agree to desegregate unions, we would have one movement. they rejected him and rejected that offer. andy young tells a story in the introduction to a book called "the closing door" and he says, you know, after king was assassinated, the johnson administration came with affirmative action and at the time, you may have read if not remembered, the civil rights movement, martin luther king had turned to full employment and poor people's campaigns as a principal demand. and the johnson administration, rather than coming up with full employment came up with affirmative action. you won't see eyes on the prize, black people marching on the street demanding affirmative action. they were demanding full employment and trying to reach out to whites, latinos, native americans, that was the division. when affirmative action happened, we knew it would only help the upper middle class within the black community, a very small percentage of african-americans kids were going to go to these elite colleges that affirmative action wa
, first of all, on what would make a difference. we don't think that a ban on so-called assault weapons, which hasn't worked in the past, is going to work this time. we think many of those proposals are basically feel-good proposals and what we really need to do is get to the question of why this is happening and what can be done about it. i don't think there's any lack of concern about dealing with the problem. i think there's a very different view as to what the problem is and how to solve it. >> the president says he wants no single piece of legislation, he wants a broad approach. are you willing to go out on a limb and predict there -- do you have the support in congress to block any federal ban on assault weapons in the coming year? >> i do not think that there is going to be a ban on so-called assault weapons passed by the congress. >> how close do you think congress can get on that? people talk about the power of the nra. they look at it almost in monumental terms. do you think in the wake of these shootings that power has been eroded at all, mr. keene? >> i don't know that the n
department spokesman would comment on harvey's release. >> i don't have a comment op this particular case. >> again, i will send you to the f.b.i. because they have the lead on all issues. >> the f.b.i. wouldn't comment on the record. >> secretary of state hillary clinton has agreed to testify about benghazi later this month. >> she has a lot to answer for. what happened in the attack, before the attack and how did they misled the world for so long. she is party not all of that. >> some say they will hold up the confirmation as c.i.a. director if he doesn't answer questions about the roll he played immediately after the september 11 benghazi attack. bret? >> meantime, one of the national security nominee is giving the step of giving interviews. what about that? >> chuck hagel considered for the defense secretary gave interview to "lincoln journal star" in his home state of nebraska. in the article that appeared after his nomination he described views as unequiv can, total support for israel. the distortions of the record have been outstanding. >> he dined at the pentagon without leon pane
second amendment rightd to the american people.mehe amea we don't think that --n so why >> why shouldn't the american people ask both sides to sides to compromise? yes, you want increased sec compromise? schools, you want te you want increased security in h schools, you want the d gaming y proliferation of violence in thu gaming industry and media to w, come down, you want to deal with say yes to the mentally ill. if the pres if we say yes to that or the president says yes to that, why doesn't he have a right to say e to you give a little on things th like background checks?in check? >> you know, if you're -- if you' >> you know, if you're looking , at the problem, which is to prevent this sort of thing, wha you want to do is do those things that will actually make o those things that w difference.il actually we have a profound disagreement. we have a profound with this administration, first of all, on what would make a w of al difference.l,hat would we don't think that a ban on m. we don't think that so-called assault weapons, whic hasn't worked in the past, is h hasn't worked in
israel striking iran to prevent this from happening. and nothing has happened. so i don't think anything is going to happen. and iran is going to continue to move forward with its nuclear development project. >> and we'll -- >> we'll have to learn to live with a contained iran rather than preventing the enrichment from happening. >> byron, thank you, for joining us daet. we're going to remember all these. >> byron, we're going to have to have you back before another year goes by. then we're going to have to see -- batting 500 do you think? last year? >> well, last year was a little better than 500. >> okay. >> byron, thank you for being here. join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" begins right now. >>> good wednesday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." the show's going well already. i'm carl, with melissa lee, jim cramer and david faber. we have earnings season officially under way. courtesy of alcoa, some pretty decent sentiment this morning. we'll talk about that with cramer in a moment. europe, numbers over there as well. germany industrial production did miss. green arrows
-- you certainly don't want to leave things worse than you found them. and this is, of course, much of the consternation and the stress, i suspect, of people in afghanistan feeling post-2014. what is going to be left behind? will the peace and stability hold? what about the ongoing development projects that are in that country? and that has been true going back to second world war and beyond. so put it into the context of syria. who can make the most meaningful contributions now? and the contribution doesn't have to be military. russia, i would suggest, should be called upon to step up and belly up to the u.n. security council and exert influence. they, i suggest, are the most influential at this time. and have the ability, number one, to stop supporting this regime that is slaughtering its citizens, to stop by its acquiescence standing on the sidelines and letting it happen while the rest of the world wrings its hands and sucks its teeth. >> how do we accomplish that? >> well, pause i think they can -- because i think they can exert influence in the capital of syria. i think they'r
. if you do think you have influenza, please don't go to your emergency room where they are swamped with patients. call your doctor first. you catch this in the first couple of days, you can get an a antiviral. i think you will see hospitals tell people to get out of the hospital. this is going to be tossed around in the next couple of days. >> we will be getting our shots. thanks. >>> meantime, the milwaukee area has seen a surge in flu-like symptoms causing people to take emergency measures. kevin is at the st. francis hospital. good morning. >> reporter: yes. it's not only through milwaukee, throughout the midwest, as we heard from dr. nancy, it's across the country. here, they're practicing something known as diversion, where so many hospitals are filled with patients suffering from flu symptoms, they're actually sending ambulances hopscotching from here to there to make sure people get the care. we're fortunate this morning to be joined by one of the doctors here, dr. kathy shallow. i guess the first question i want to ask, is this worse than say the swine flu 2009? >> the swin
of the store. antioch police were here taking down any information. but we don't know any suspects' descriptions at this point. but at this moment, the clerk refused medical attention. he's working this morning. he says that he's a little bit spooked out by what happened. but he will continue to work until the owner gets here. roughly around 9:00 this morning. he also says he just started this job about a week ago. we're live in antioch, brian flores, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> police in gilroy are looking for a man they say tried to pick up an 11-year-old girl walking home. it happened on monterey road last week. police say the man offered her a ride but when another driver saw what was happening. he took off. police say the man was driving a ford green 2000 astrovan. the suspect is described as an hispanic man between 50 to 60 years old with short black here and a mustache. >>> petaluma police are also investigating a similar incident. yesterday, a 14-year-old girl reported that a man asked her to get into his car just outside westside elementary school. police say the girl kept wa
want to say that as much as i enjoy my gun rights i don't totally agree with wayne lapierre. as a matter of fact, i stay out of the n.r.a. because it is more political than protecting my rights, in my opinion. but i do feel that these outleft-handish attacks on -- outland i outlandish attacks on gun owners and my enjoyment they want to get rid of assault rifles. i have to say a bolt action and se rifle are two different things. when i shoot i enjoy shooting with a semiauto so my shoulder doesn't get broke. i'm not a hunter but i do enjoy shooting. i enjoy protecting myself and having the right to but that is my responsibility. host: how do you strike the balance? clearly you are right in the second amendment rights of the constitution. caller: i was just about to get that if i own a gun i can disarm it. that was the mother's gupn that her mother killed her with. i don't put mine in a case and if i did i would be smart enough to disable it if someone couldn't use it. it is personal responsibility but i don't see the n.r.a. going after that. it is strictly that i can own my gu
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